Logo Our Family Tree Branch: Descendants of James Taylor I (died VA 1698) Descendants of James Taylor I (died VA 1698)
 
    

Contents

Nathaniel Lane Taylor as concerns early Taylors

This quote* is from the book An American Taylor Family (Chapter 1: Bogus Origins) by Nathaniel Lane Taylor online at:  www.nltaylor.net/taylor/

 

2. Dr. Rowland Taylor, Protestant Martyr (via John, of Lancaster County)

Another widely-circulated amateur work alleges a completely different ancestry for Richard

Taylor of North Farnham—Mary Taylor Brewer’s From Log Cabins to the White House: a

History of the Taylor Family (Wooton, Kentucky, 1985). Brewer’s book asserts that Richard

Taylor of North Farnham was a son of John Taylor, who d. before 6 January 1652, of Lancaster

County, Virginia at the mouth of the Rappahannock River. This John is in turn stated to be a

descendant of Reverend Dr. Rowland Taylor, chaplain to Archbishop Thomas Cranmer and

rector of Hadleigh, Suffolk, who was burned at the stake on 5 February 1555 as a Protestant

under the persecutions of the Catholic Queen Mary (‘Bloody Mary’). Rowland Taylor’s

imprisonment and execution are glorified in maudlin detail in John Foxe’s famous Protestant

martyrology Acts and Monuments.22 Brewer links other early Virginia Taylors to the same stem:

one Andrew Taylor of Spotsylvania County, VA, as well as the immigrant James Taylor, founder

of the large and prominent Taylor family which included President Zachary Taylor.23

 

23 There is no satisfactory scholarly account of the early generations of the James Taylor family in print. The

best account which I have seen (2005) is the unpublished work of Ann Blomquist of Orlando, FL.

 

In fact the origins of John Taylor of Lancaster Co. are unknown; and furthermore there is no

evidence to connect any colonial immigrant Taylors to the English family of the martyred

priest.24 John Taylor’s estate is the earliest probated estate of an individual by the name of

Taylor which survives from the Northern Neck.25 Lancaster probate and court records do indicate

John of Lancaster Co. and his wife Elizabeth had at least a daughter named Elizabeth (who

married one Simon Sallard) and a son Richard Taylor, mentioned in the will of his step-father

Tobias Horton in October 1668. However, this Richard was dead by 22 May 1669, when his

sister Elizabeth Sallard took administration of his estate and inherited his land.26

 

24 On Rowland Taylor’s known family and children see William James Brown, The life of Rowland Taylor LL.

D., rector of Hadleigh in the Deanery of Bocking (London, 1959). Material showing some generations of Rowland

Taylor’s descendants has been circulated on the Internet, but I am not aware of any published scholarly discussion of

Rowland Taylor’s descendants in England, let alone any evidence of connection to colonists.

25 See Index to Virginia Wills and Administrations, s.n. ‘Taylor’.

26 These data are presented by Brewer, Log Cabins, 42-46, who suggests that John Taylor must have had two

sons named Richard (in addition to a large fictitous family of other sons mentioned as headrights scattered across

Virginia). In the absence of any evidence this claim must be rejected.

 

____________________

 

This quote* is from an article by Nathaniel Lane Taylor, published in 2009 in “The American Genealogist” and may be found here:   http://www.nltaylor.net/taylor/Taylor_origins_2009.pdf

 

The American Genealogist

Whole Number 331 Vol. 83, No. 3

January/April 2009

(published October 2009)

 

THE FALSE AND POSSIBLY TRUE ENGLISH ORIGIN OF

RICHARD1 TAYLOR OF OLD RAPPAHANNOCK COUNTY,

VIRGINIA

By Nathaniel Lane Taylor

 

Genealogy abhors a vacuum. Genealogists at any level like to turn over as

many stones as possible. But when confronted with a subject of unknown parentage,

too many of us will find any secondary source that assigns some parents,

and in go the names. Of the eighteen entries in the WorldConnect Internet pedigree

database collection for Richard1 Taylor, a planter who died in 1679 in Old

Rappahannock County, Virginia, fourteen blithely assign parentage to him.1

Eight follow one amateur genealogical book published in 1985 by Mary Taylor

Brewer of Wooton, Kentucky, in naming his father as John Taylor of Lancaster

County (d. 1651/2).2 The other six follow an older tradition, first circulated in the

1920s in a short typescript by Mary Taylor Logan of Louisville, Kentucky, making

him son of another Richard Taylor, an “ancient planter” found in the borough

of Charles City on the James River in the Muster Roll of 1624/5.3

Neither of these two claims has ever been supported by evidence, and one of

them can be promptly excluded. John Taylor of Lancaster County (the original

Northern Neck county) did in fact leave a son Richard, as well as a daughter

Elizabeth, subsequently married to Simon Sallard. However, the son Richard died

 

1 A free-access site accumulating user-submitted gedcom files, online at <http://worldconnect

.genealogy.rootsweb.com>; data polled as of 8 Aug. 2007.

2 Mary Taylor Brewer, From Log Cabins to the White House: History of the Taylor Family

(Wooton, Ky., 1985). According to the Social Security Death Index, Mrs. Brewer, who was born

in 1909, died in Dec. 1985.

3 Mary Taylor Logan, “Taylor,” typescript (Louisville, Ky., ca. 1926), 14 pp. (hereafter cited

as Logan, “Taylor”). Mrs. Logan’s work, though never printed, appears to be the earliest source

of this claimed parentage, which gradually diffused among descendants of the Kentucky branches

of this family. This manuscript is available on this author’s website at <www.nltaylor.net/taylor

/MTLogan_1926.pdf>.

 

 

162 The American Genealogist [January/April]

 

intestate before 22 May 1669, when his sister Elizabeth Sallard was found to be

his sole heir.4 The book that makes this claim for Richard of Old Rappahannock

County simply says that John had two sons named Richard; it further alleges that

John was also father of the founders of two other Virginia Taylor families—

James Taylor of New Kent (subsequently King and Queen) County, ancestor of

President Zachary Taylor; and Andrew Taylor of Spotsylvania County. While no

evidence is presented for any of these filiations, similarly no evidence is presented

for John Taylor’s claimed English ancestry—a line extending back to

Reverend Rowland Taylor, chaplain to Archbishop Thomas Cranmer, and rector

of Hadleigh, Suffolk, who was burned at the stake on 9 February 1555 as a Protestant

under Queen Mary, and who was enshrined as one of the heroes of early

Protestant martyrology.5

The James River parentage claim is similarly based on groundless assumptions.

Richard Taylor, the “ancient planter” on the James, was an older man (aged

50) with a young wife Dorothy and infant daughter Mary, in the “corporation of

Charles Cittie” at the time of the Muster Roll of 1624/5.6 He may have subsequently

had a son Richard, as there was a man of that name in Charles City

County in the 1650s.7 (The younger Richard Taylor of Charles City County, who

also had a wife Sarah, is sometimes identified with Richard1 Taylor of Old Rappahannock

County; but he was somewhat older and completely distinct.)

 

4 Brewer, From Log Cabins to the White House, 42–46. On this John Taylor of Lancaster

Co., see William P. Carrell II, “Ancestry of Sarah (Lawson) Hathaway, Wife of William Hathaway

of Enon Hall, Lancaster County, Virginia,” typescript (Louisville, Ky., 2007), available at

<www.enonhall.com/pdf/lineage.LAWSONTAYLOR.pdf>; Mrs. L. C. Anderson, “The Taylor

Family of Northumberland and Lancaster Counties,” The Virginia Magazine of History and

Biography 35(1927):211–18, 309–12, 36(1928):388–89; and Chester Horton Brent, The Ancestry

of Hugh Brent (Rutland, Vt., 1936), 26, 234, 253. Mr. Carrell, following an assertion in the Brent

genealogy, makes a case for identifying John Taylor of Lancaster Co. with an earlier John Taylor

in Isle of Wight Co. in the 1630s, and an earlier John Taylor in Elizabeth City in 1624/5, who was

an “Ancient Planter” stated to have arrived in Virginia in 1610.

5 Rowland Taylor’s imprisonment and execution are chronicled in detail in John Foxe’s

Protestant martyrology, first published in 1563: The Acts and Monuments of John Foxe, 4th ed.,

rev. and corr. by Rev. Josiah Pratt; intro. by Rev. John Stoughton, 8 vols. (London, 1877), 6:676–

703. On Rowland Taylor’s known family and children, see William James Brown, The Life of

Rowland Taylor LL.D., Rector of Hadleigh in the Deanery of Bocking (London, 1959). Material

purporting to show some generations of Rowland Taylor’s descendants has circulated on the Internet,

but I am not aware of any published documented work on Rowland Taylor’s descendants

in England, let alone any evidence of connection to colonists.

6 “The Muster of the Inhabitants of the Neck of Land in the Corporation of Charles Cittie in

Virginia taken the 24th of January 1624[/5],” printed in John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of

Purse and Person, 1607–1624/5, 4th ed., 3 vols. (Baltimore, 2007), 1:10.

7 Virginia Lee Hutcheson Davis, Tidewater Families, 2nd ed. (Baltimore, 1990), 566–70. In

a detailed sketch of the younger Richard Taylor of Charles City Co., she mentioned Richard the

“ancient planter” but, responsibly, did not make much of the possible connection

 

 

*These quotes are posted by me, Steve Taylor, with permission from Nathaniel Lane Taylor via email 22 Jan 2012.

Related people

James Taylor I
John Taylor
Thomas Taylor

Sources
Posted By: Steve Taylor

  1. Other: Nathaniel Lane Taylor research, website: www.nltaylor.net; Website

Updated: 1-21-2012
 Please login or register to leave a comment on this page.
Login or Email:  Password:Don't have a login? Register!Why register?I forgot my login....