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* updated last 30 days


 Completeness

It is always important to have a birthdate and birthplace (and even a speculated birthdate if necessary), and a deathdate and deathplace where possible, for many reasons:
  1. It helps with searching...
          • if you search for someone born between 1700 and 1750, but include those without birthdates in the search, this includes many people that don't need to be included as they may have been born centuries earlier or later, but just not recorded here.  So getting the date in drops them out of the search results.
          • If you are searching for someone born about 1750, and you see in the search results a birthdate of 1750, then this will be more likely to catch your attention.  If it's blank, it won't.
          • Even if you're not searching by date, but just scrolling through search results, it's disconcerting to see people with no dates or places, as you don't know as much about them.
          • If you're searching for people who lived in a certain state, you will not find people who don't have any locations recorded.
  2. It exposes relationship errors relationship errors that would have not been found otherwise.
  3. It helps to find duplicate people, as only people with birthdates are included in duplicate searches.
  4. There's an automated tool to find connections from your data to other people's data, based on matching dates and places -- but if dates and places are not defined, these people are not included.
  5. NC MapPlaces that are filled in show up in shaded maps, which drill down to your data.  If yours are not entered, they won't show.
  6. Places that are filled in show up in other websites that extract and display data from here based on place.  If yours are not entered, they won't show.
  7. It saves the website administrator the grief of having hounding everyone to do this, and working with your data when you don't.

Also do searches over your existing data to fill in previous gaps, and consider doing the same to help out other researchers.

If you have any ideas on how to inspire others to be more complete in their data, or if you would like to help fill in gaps in other people's data, please contact the administrator.



Updated: 11-12-2016