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ChildrenFirst NameBirth DtDeath DtBirth PlaceSpouses
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Richard 

abt 165104/06/1731  VA, Northampton Co, Marionville Frances West 
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Sara 

abt 1654abt MAR 1713  VA, Accomack Co, Accomac Pasco Curle Or Curie 
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  • Will, : 7/27/1635 Thomas ADDAMS, Gentleman & Adventurer, immigrated from Gravesend, England aboard the ship Primrose bound for Virginia at the age of 21, counted as a headright for John NEALE. He was traveling with William PIERCE (brother of Hannah PIERCE), who was also counted as a headright for John NEALE. Richard KELLAM also traveled on this ship at age 16 and eventually the KELLAM and ADAMS families intermarried. 1663 7 Tithables in Accomack County, Virginia WILL ABSTRACT KELLAM, RICHARD -- 1 June 1703 - 6 Oct 1703 To 2 sons Edward & William Kellam 5 s. each. To dau. Sarah Kellam, now Curle. Dau. Ann Kellam, now Wallis. Dau. Rachel Lingo 5 s. each. To dau. Rose Kellam, now Garretson, 60 A on Burrels Branch. To godson William Onely, son of Clement Onely. To son William 50 A aj. his own land on Beaver dam branch. To son Richard 5 s. Wife Sarah Exec. Witt: Stephen Waltham, William Sill - p321 (W&c 1692-1715 xi)
  • Other, : "From Constance Kellam's book: Richard Kellum, also spelled Kellam, came to Northampton County, on the eastern shore of Virginia, in 1635. He had sailed from London on the ship "Primrose", under Captain Douglas. He was examined by Captain Douglas "touching conformity to the Allegiance and Supremacy". On July 27, 1635, the ship left Gravesend, England. Richard would have been only 16. When he arrived in Northampton County, he was indentured to Nicholas Widdelowe (Waddelowe), a Quaker farmer, to pay for his passage. In 1649, Nicholas received 400 acres for transporting 8 people, one of whom was Richard Kellam. Nicholas and his three daughters, Comfort, Patience and Temperance, fled from the eastern shore of Virginia and settled in Maryland because they were persecuted by Col. Scarborough, as "dissenters" (not adhering to the Protestant Episcopal Church, The Church of England). During his life he encouraged others to emigrate from England, paid for their passage, and claimed 50 acres for
    bringing each one. Records show he claimed land in 1651 and 1653 on that basis. In 1664, he claimed land again, listing some of the same names a second time, as well as adding some new ones. Evidently "false claims" were done by some very respectable people. Lord Berkley also gave Richard a large grant. Richard was a friend of the Indians as well as Colonel Edmund Scarborough, aide to the governor, who actually ruled the colony. Richard accumulated 2400 acres in Accomac County, Virginia. On May 7, 1655, land owned by Richard was determined to be the best place for aport, meetinghouse, Clerk's office and Sheriff's office. In 1663, Richard went north to the Pocomoke River, in Somerset County, Maryland, and purchased 500 acres of land which he called "Kellam's Folly". Col. Edmund Scarborough later invaded this same area to claim it for Virginia but failed when it was revealed he had falsified maps and records in order to move Virginia's boundary too far north. Lord Calvert protested
    that this interfered with the lines drawn from the grant from the King and Col. Scarborough had to withdraw. However, Richard did not "improve" the land, which had to be done after purchasing or claiming it a headright, so the claim lapsed and in 1665 it was resurveyed and given to Rober Ingraham. In 1693, Richard lost his temper in court and swore. He apologized, expressing "humble supplication and penitence" and "because of the humility of the offender" and the fact it was his first crime, the
    court remitted his fine. Before his death, Richard transferred all but 110 acres to his children. Constance Kellam feels that Richard was an interesting, colorful figure, and a friendly, energetic and warm-hearted likeable adventurer. His will is dated october 10, 1703 and is on file in Accomac County."

    According to Richard Vaughan: Eastern Shore Mariner, By Mercedes Quesada-Embid, http://www.delmarvasettlers.org/profiles/vaughn.html (accessed 10/5/07):

    "Vaughan was also placed in charge of a court case where the Natives were accused of stealing from Richard Kellum.[18] Vaughan was chosen to settle the matter; probably due to his seemingly good rapport with the natives. In another instance with Kellum, the Native King, Andyaman, complained about Kellum?s behavior toward his tribe. Vaughan was again asked to examine and determine the disturbance at Kellum?s house with regard to the Natives and settle the dispute.[19]

    18 Orders, Deeds and Wills 1651-1654. Book IV. p. 84.
Sources
  1. Website:Roots Ancestors and Wings;
    Source from: J.J. Burks
  2. Website:Logans New England and Beyond;
    Source from: Tom Burks
  1. Website:Roots Ancestors and Wings;
    Source from: J.J. Burks
  2. Website:Logans New England and Beyond;
    Source from: Tom Burks
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Added
1-21-2010 11:28 AM
1-21-2010 11:28 AM
Updated
10-31-2017 09:14 AM
10-31-2017 09:14 AM
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