Logo Our Family Tree Branch: Kennedy of Cranagh House, Coleraine 
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James Kennedy + ___ MacLeary
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George Kennedy, Sr.OCT 1775 -- 17 NOV 1857avatar
Mary PaulAPR 1776 -- 25 MAY 1835avatar
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Rev James Kennedy Limavady pic

Rev.1 James1 Kennedy1 , D.D.

Birth15 AUG 1818
Church records say Drumreagh, but he was more likely born at Camus, Coleraine
Death26 JAN 1898
at KenMor Place
Grave
 
Aged: 79.5 years
Coleraine Chronicle 20 May 1848: On the 9th instant, in the Reformed Presbyterian Church, Newtownlimavady, by the Rev. James P. Sweeney, A.M., The Rev. James Kennedy, to Eliza Conn, daughter of the late Thomas Conn, Esq., Coleraine.

Coleraine Chronicle 12 April 1851: 9 Apr. at Enagh, Newtownlimavady, son to lady of Rev. James Kennedy. this would have been Thomas.

1880 Census for New York City, New York: James (head of household), Age 62, marital status widower, occupation Minister of the Gospel, Birthplace Ireland, Father's birthplace Ireland, Mother's birthplace Ireland, Other people in the household were daughters Mary, Lizzie, Sarah and Matilda, as well as a servant named Ellen Kuhan.

Educated at Bryce's academy Royal Belfast Academical Institute and Paisley (Reference: Royal Belfast Academical Institute Alumni 1814-1875; Son of Mr. George Kennedy, Coleraine; 1835-1840; taught by Rev. James Bryce, Ballyclough (Aghadowey?).
Licensed Northern Presbytery, 20th May 1842
Ordained Limavady 1843, May 18
Resigned 2nd August 1870
Mod. Irish Synod 1846
Installed 4th New York Reformed Presbyterian 13th Nov 1870
American Synod 1875
Graduated D.D. Geneva 1886
Retired October 30 1894
Died 1898 Jan 26 interred Bronxville Cemetery
Published "Tekel" 1858
Published "Assurance of Grace and Salvation" 1877
Appointed Prof. in Reformed Presbyterian Theological Seminary in 1887, declined appointment on account of age and attachment to pastoral ministry.
Published "Christ in the Song"

Oct. 1891: Rev. James conducted the funeral service for his brother, Robert Kennedy, at the Fourth Reformed Presbyterian Church, New York. Robert is buried at Bronxville Cemetery.

A family member wrote concerning Eliza (Conn): "she was the third child preceded by Jane & Margaret, followed by Anne, Mary Sarah, Robert Thomas 1830-36, Hugh, Matilda, Robert Thomas (2nd) 1838-39, Ellen".

Posted on February 9, 2011 by Old Light Covenanter
W. Melancthon Glasgow, History of the Reformed Presbyterian Church in America (Baltimore: Hill & Harvey, 1888), p. 559.
JAMES KENNEDY:
Son of George and Mary (Paul) Kennedy, was born near Bonn(?), County Londonderry, Ireland, August 15, 1818. He received his early training in the classical school of the Rev. James Bryce, and graduated from the Belfast Academical Institution in 1840. He studied theology in the Seminary of Paisley, Scotland, and was licensed by the Northern Presbytery, Ireland, May 10, 1842. He was ordained by the Western Presbytery, and installed pastor of the united congregations of Broadlane and Drimbolg, Newtonlimavady, County Londonderry, Ireland, May 18, 1843, and resigned this charge, August 2, 1870. He came to America the same summer, and was installed pastor of the Fourth congregation of New York City, New York, November 13, 1870, where he is in charge. He married Miss Eliza Conn, of Coleraine, Ireland, May 9, 1848. He published "Tekel,"Â? 1858, pp. 40. "Assurance of Grace and Salvation,"Â? 1877, pp. 48. He contributed a series of articles on "The Spiritual Senses"Â? to Our Banner, 1878, and an exposition of the Sabbath School Lessons to the Christian Nation, 1885, and many other articles in the Church papers and magazines. He was Moderator of the Irish Synod in 1846, and of the American Synod in 1875.

Owen F. Thompson, Sketches of the Ministers of the Reformed Presbyterian Church of North America from 1888 to 1930 ([S.1.]: Synod of the Reformed Presbyterian Church of North America, [1930?]), pp. 161, 162.
"JAMES KENNEDY D.D, whose historical sketch is carried forward to the year 1888 in Glasgow's History, was at that time in charge of the Fourth Reformed Presbyterian congregation of New York City. In the year 1886 the degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred on him by Geneva College. The following year he was elected to fill the chair in the Theological Seminary left vacant by Dr. Sloane. This honor and service was declined on account of age and attachment to his own congregation. On the fiftieth anniversary of his ordination an appropriate and affectionate address was delivered by him to his beloved people. During the richest period of his later life he prepared and published the volume, "Christ in the Song."Â? He was officially released from his charge on October 30, 1894. In 1897 he removed with his daughter to Saint John, New Brunswick. Here he resided in contentment, preaching a few times as he was able, and bearing infirmities in the spirit of his Master. He passed from earth on January 26, 1898, having been in the Gospel Ministry for 55 years. He was in the pastorate in the North of Ireland from 1843 to 1870, and in the United States from 1870 to 1894. The peace in the latter end and the departure of this godly man spoke more loudly of the reality of the Christian faith than many sermons could have done. The funeral was held in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Hugh O'Neill. The service was conducted by Dr. Sommerville, assisted by other ministers who had been close to him in life. He was laid to rest in the Covenanter burying ground at Bronxville. "Let my last end be like his."Â?
On moving to Canada: The change of scene seemed favourable to his health. He was contented and happy in his new home. He felt strong enough to preach twice for the congregation in St. John. But the bodily frame was weakening more rapidly than any one suspected. Heart action decreased in vigor and from this other parts of the system suffered. The end came on the 26th of January 1898, after only a few days of actual prostration. It was peaceful in every way. In life he was ever reticent on matters nearest his heart, and in the hour and article of death he spoke little. But his composed spirit and placid countenance betokened the triumph of faith and were more eloquent than speech in commending the death of the righteous.
This sketch would scarcely be complete without a particular reference to Matilda Kennedy, the daughter who was the constant companion of her father during his last years. She was companion, care-taker, amanuensis, and it was she who provided for the publication of this volume as a Memorial. Her devotion was so unremitting that she denied herself the ease and change of pace which might have improved her health and prolonged her days. He health was not vigorous, and after the shock of a father's death it declined rapidly. In November, 1898 about ten months after the aged father she closed her earthly life and went to her reward. She lived in quietness and did her part, a part that was rich in spiritual significance, and to those who know, a memory of precious worth". - Matilda passed away in New Brunswich with her brother-in-law, Dr. William S. Morrison, in attendance.

Synod of R.P. Church June 1st 1898: The Clerk of the N.Y. Presbytry reported the death of Rev. James Kennedy:
JAMES KENNEDY. - The Board has recorded on its minutes the death of Rev. James Kennedy, D. D., on Wednesday, Jan. 26, 1898. He was appointed one of its members in 1884, and was for six years its honored and beloved president. To this branch of the Church's service he brought mental endowments of a high order and a heart thoroughly devoted to the Divine Master. His interest in the work intrusted to the administration of the Board was seen in the regularity with which he attended its meetings, and the wise suggestions which he invariably made when questions affecting the management and progress of the work were under discussion. A man of deep religious experience, his prayers for the missionaries and their converts and the extension of the Redeemer's kingdom were peculiarly impressive and inspiring. Dr. Kennedy, a faithful, studious, noble man of God, has been called to rest from his labors and has passed from our sight. But the remembrance of a saintly character remains with us as a beautiful afterglow upon the hills when the sun has gone down.

There are many references to Rev. Dr. James Kennedy, his letters, sermons, and articles, etc. in various vulumns of the Reformed Presbyterian and Covenanter.
Mr. Kennedy had resigned the care of his congregation in 1896, and in November of 1897 he moved with his daughter to St. John, New Brunswick. The change was made for domestic reasons. It took off his shoulders the charge of a house and it brought him under the immediate care of a devoted daughter _ Mrs. Dr. Morrison _ and her family.

James Kennedy died January 26, 1898 at KenMor Place in Hampton (near St. John) .
The change of scene seemed favourable to his health. He was contented and happy in his new home. He felt strong enough to preach twice for the congregation in St. John. But the bodily frame was weakening more rapidly than any one suspected. Heart action decreased in vigor and from this other parts of the system suffered. The end came on the 26th of January 1898, after only a few days of actual prostration. It was peaceful in every way. In life he was ever reticent on matters nearest his heart, and in the hour and article of death he spoke little. But his composed spirit and placid countenance betokened the triumph of faith and were more eloquent than speech in commending the death of the righteous.


_______________

This sketch would scarcely be complete without a particular reference to Matilda Kennedy, the daughter who was the constant companion of her father during his last years. She was companion, care-taker, amanuensis, and it was she who provided for the publication of this volume as a Memorial. He devotion was so unremitting that she denied herself the ease and change of place which might have improved her health and prolonged her days. He health was not vigorous, and after the shock of a father's death it declined rapidly. In November, 1898 _ about ten months after the aged father _ she closed her earthly life and went to her reward. She lived in quietness and did her part _ a part that was rich in spiritual significance, and to those who know, a memory of precious worth."

Eliza Conn

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Sources
  1. Book:History of Colonial Gentry; Sir Bernard Burke, C.B., LL.D., Ulster King of Arms, 1891 (p 279-280);
  1. Book:History of Colonial Gentry; Sir Bernard Burke, C.B., LL.D., Ulster King of Arms, 1891 (p 279-280);
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12-14-2012 02:53 PM
Updated
12-14-2012 03:34 PM
12-14-2012 03:00 PM
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