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Grand
Parents
James World + Martha Elizabeth "Mattie" Still
James Henry Burdick + Ella Mae Willett
Edward Eugene Page + Betsy Anna "Anna" Bennett
Clyde Herbert Darrow + Cora Belle Way
Parents
Thomas Gaino World23 APR 1882 -- 16 SEP 1936avatar
Annie Elizabeth Burdick22 JAN 1887 -- 20 FEB 1966avatar
Frank Edward Page22 FEB 1879 -- 26 MAR 1958avatar
Maude May Darrow21 OCT 1885 -- 6 AUG 1932avatar
Spouses
Marriage14 DEC 192512
 
12
Names

Events
World 046_RReSize

James Henry1 3 5 6 7 8 10 World1 3 5 6 7 8 10

Birth21 NOV 19051 3 5 6 7 8
 
1 3 5 6 7 8
Religion1905-1092salvationist
Reside1910
Reside19205
 
5
OtherJUN 1924
 
From Training College, orders to help open Whttier Salvation Army Corps
Tag1925-1925 Salvation Army officer
short time
Reside192810
 
10
1117 1/2 Lomitas Drive; same address as Mrs. Violet World [his wife] and Mrs. Annie E. World [his mother]; Occupation: Carpenter10
Reside19306
 
6
4536 Amber Place, Head of household, with wife, Mrs. Violet; Apprentice; 1209 3/4 Lomitas, car builder, with wife, Cora V.
Reside1932
 
with wife, Vioelt; same address as [his father], Thomas World.
Tag1932 machinist
Reside1934
 
4536 Anber Place
Tag1934 mechanic
Ideal Auto Court
Military1935-1939
 
CA Army National Guard
Califronia National Guard. Played trombone in the band.
Flag of California
Reside19357
 
7
Reside1937
 
with wife, Cora, at 2922 1/2 W., Sacramento, CA
Reside1937
 
with wife, Violet C., at 1152 Eliott Way
Reside1939
 
Listed alone
Tag1939 truckman
Southern Pacifid RR
Reside19407  
 
7
Del Paso Avenue; Occupation: Tender repairman, steam railway7
Reside1941-1942
 
Resideabt 1943
 
55 Lapidge St. Also listed were Charles Sholin (by then deceased); Nellie E. Sholin (by then head of household); George Sholin, & Violet World
Moved1945
 
with wife and children: Edward, Thomas, & possibly James, Jr.
Moved6 MAY 1947
 
Returned to state with wife, Violet; and children, Edward and Thomas
Reside1955
 
229 Del paso Avenue with wife, Violet (separate listing, same residence)
Tag1955 printing assistant
State Printing Office
Org.4 APR 1969 Freemason, Royal Patron
Twenty Nine Palms, California
Death1 DEC 19823
 
3
Cause: stroke
Grave3 DEC 19821 1
entombment
Aged: 77 years
NOTE: When James was commissioned as a Salvation Army officer, Evangeline Booth was definitely in attendance. A photo exists of the cadets with Evangeline Booth front and center.  However, it is not known exactly who commissioned the cadets. By her presence, this author assumes she was the person doing the actual commissioning.


By the way, James and Violet did not last long as officers. They wanted to marry, but in Salvation Army officer tradition, they were required to wait for permission. They didn't wait. So that was the end of their career as officers, though they remained faithful soldiers for life.

In undated notes taken before 1993 from a conversation with Violet Page World: her husband, Jim World, was in the band of the California National Guard just before World War II (specifically 1938). He was blind in one eye at the time.

James loved uniforms. He was a Boy Scout leader, a Sea Scout leader, a National Guard Bandsman, a San Quentin Prison guard, a volunteer fireman, a reserve police officer, a Mason, and a member of the Salvation Army. There are photos of him in all of the above uniforms except for the Sea Scout uniform.

One can see from photos of him as a young man that he was very fun-loving.

California Voter Registrations shows Jim living in Los Angeles County in 1932, living with Violet, his wife, in the same household as his father and mother, Thomas B. and Annie World, at 435 W. Ramona Blvd. They were all registered Republicans.

In 1944, the same source shows James H. World and Violet World living at 57 Lapidge Street in San Francisco. Their son-in-law, George C. Sholin, was living at 55 Lapidge Street, as was his mother, Mrs. Nellie E. Sholin. George's wife, Eva, was of course, not listed, since she was not yet 21, the age required in California for voting in those days.

James and his wife, Violet, and two youngest children spent two years in Honolulu, Hawaii, where he worked in a children's home. When they flew back to the mainland on 6 May 1947, James, age 41, was described as a social worker and Violet as a housewife. At the time, he weighed 160 pounds. Violet, age 40, weighed 170 pounds. Edward, 11, weighted 90 pounds and Thomas, 4, weighted 35 pounds.
Violet Page 01R

Cora Violet "Violet"1 3 4 5 6 8 10 Page1 3 4 5 6 8 10

Birth3 MAR 19071 3 4 5 6 8
 
1 3 4 5 6 8
Religion1907-1997salvationist
Reside19103 8
 
3 8
Reside1919
 
at 656 14th, same address as [her parents], Frank E and Maud D Page
Reside19204
 
4
Tag1925-1925 Salvation Army officer
short time
Reside192810
 
10
1117 1/2 Lomitas Drive; same address as James H. World [her husband] & Mrs. Annie E. World [her mother-in-law]; Occupation: Housewife10
Reside19305
 
5
Reside19356
 
6
Reside1940 
 
Del Paso Avenue
Resideabt 1944
 
55 Lapidge St. Also listed were Charles Sholin (by then deceased); Nellie E. Sholin (by then head of household); George Sholin, & James World
Tag1944 janitor
San Francisco
Death20 SEP 19971 8
 
1 8
Grave25 SEP 19971 1
Aged: 90.6 years
NOTE: When Violet was commissioned as a Salvation Army officer, Evangeline Booth was definitely in attendance. A photo exists of the cadets with Evangeline Booth front and center. However, it is not known exactly who commissioned the cadets. By her presence, this author assumes she was the person doing the actual commissioning.

By the way, James and Violet did not last long as officers. They wanted to marry, but in Salvation Army officer tradition, they were required to wait for permission. They didn't wait.  So that was the end of their career as officers, though they remained faithful soldiers for life.

Violet was a working mom. She worked as a clerk in the Salvation Army Thrift Store on L Street, Sacrramento. When her daughter, Eva, had a devistating stroke at age 29, not only did Violet continue working and taking care of her own underage sons, but she also took on the job of laundry for Eva's family, which consisted of Eva and her husband, as well as their six children.

The following is a reprint from "The Sholin/World Family History Book, 1993," collected and edited by Virginia Sholin Smallwood. This article is "My Memories of World War One," by Violet Page World:

"My mother and father never talked about the war. Mama did not like war so I can't remember when it started. they hid the newspapers from us - no radio or TV then.

"I know my father was transferred on the trains to sort mail. He used to sort mail to El Paso, Texas, and slept all the way home. They sent him from Los Angeles to San Franciso, to the Canadian border sorting mail. Because of the war he transferred around.

"Men running away from the draft would hide in the house next door that was vacant. They borrowed a frying pan from Mama and some eggs to fry. Mama was afraid to stay alone in our house so we moved to Redlands to Grandpa's house.

"At school, we gathered around the flag outdoors and sang war songs and 'America,' 'The Star Spangled Banner,' and the French National Anthem, and said silent prayers for the soldiers. When I was in the third grade we (the girls) would have to make feather stitch on infant gowns for the French and Belgian babies. The boys were to cut cotton rags into snips (like confetti) to make pillows for the soldiers. Vivian and I went to the Red Cross to get khaki yarn to knit wool socks for the soldiers. I knit one and Vivian the other.

"Vivian was for a size twelve foot. Mine was for a size six foot. Mama made us take it to the Red Cross. We were ashamed of the way they looked. The Red Cross thanked us for trying and said they could use the year. We also saved gum wrappers or any foil we could find. when we got enough we would sell it. I found twenty five cents' worth and bought a war stamp. boy, I really thought I was rich. They sold the stamps to the school children. Wehn we got enough we could get a five dollar war bond. I never got any more.

"When I was in the sixth grade, we had to make a war bond speech. The children were all sick that one day, all coming down with the flu. [Editor's note: this was during the infamous Spanish flu epidemic that took the lives of millions.] They sent quite a few home that day. When it was almost time for me to make my speech, I asked the teacher if I could go home. she said, "No."

"I remember giving my speech. I can't remember going home but I made it. I didn't remember anything for a whole week. The whole family had it except my mother and Frances. When we all got over it, Mama came down with it and she sent for Dad to come home. Frances said she wouldn't get the flu and she didn't.

"When the Armistice was signed all the whistles in town sounded off and the war was officially over. Mama went to work and told us kids to stay home. We had moved to San Bernardino. Then Vivian decided it was over and we all went to town anyway. The whole town stopped what they were doing and filled the streets. We met Mama down town and she bought all of us little flags. The next week, we had a Liberty Parade and all six of us kids marched in it. The Salvation Army band from Los Angeles came and marched in it. That day they hung a dummy in the park, a replica of Kaiser Wilhelm.

"One day three planes flew over Granpa Darrow's house in Redlands. My father, mother, grandma, and grandpa all ran out to see the planes. We had never seen any. Mama and Dad sent us all to the basement. They said it could be the Germans, but they stayed out and watched.

"A few months later they bought a train car through San Bernardino with war relics the Salvation Army had collected. A few months later President Wilson came through on a train going to San Diego. He had had a stroke and was very sick. Vivian said she was going down to the Santa Fe Depot and shake hands with the president. Vivian and I got up early and were down to the Santa Fe Depot an hour before the train arrived. We got as close to the rope as we could get. A little girl took out a bouquet of roses. As soon as she got off the train, Vivian and I crawled through the ropes and shook hands with the president and his wife before the police could hold us back.

"During the war we couldn't get enough flour and sugar to make bread but could get corn meal and barley flour, also rice flour, so we baked bread fro Grandpa and ate corn bread and baker's bread for us. Grandpa wouldn't eat bread bought from the store, so Mama bought store bread for us and saved the home made bread for Grandpa. They would sell only ten pounds of flour and sugar per family. Grandma had to go to the store and buy it and mama had to go to the store also to get enough for all of us. Grandma and Grandpa made ten of us.

"Buying cotton or woolen clothes was very expensive. Shoes went up from one dollar per pair to seven to ten dollars per pair. they weren't rationed but were hard to get. Mama during the war bought us tennis shoes at about fifty cents per pair. Leather shoes went so high, we couldn't keep four children in shoes for school. For the Victory Parade, Mama went to the store to buy me some white shoes. They were all leather at the cost of $7.00 per pair. She came home and cried because they cost so much. My father, at that time, was getting only $45.00 per month for them and six children. He gave Mama $40.00 and saved $15.00 to pay his expenses while working. When the war was over he got $60.00 pre month. that was for sorting mail on the train for the Post Office."

In a conversation with Violet (date unknown, but before 1993), she said she and her husband-to-be were in [Salvation Army] officer training at the same time, 1924-25. She didn't know it, but he had been writing to her sister and herself at the same time. Vivian, she said, "had five or six guys on the string and Jim was one of them."

In a phone conversation with Violet on 12 May 1991, she said she and her husband were living in Riverside, California when her mother, Maude Darrow Page, died. Violet and Jim lived rent-free in a nice house in return for Jim regularly checking on some vacant houses.

Another tidbit: Violet purchased land in the name of Cora Violet World. The record is at the Bureau of Land Management's web site.

Violet purchased 5.72 acres in the San Bernardino Meridian in San Bernardino County. Aliquot parts: 13, Section 24, Township: 1-N, Lot 13 of SENE. This was purchased from the Los Angeles, CA Land Office on 5 Dec 1958.

ChildrenFirst NameBirth DtDeath DtBirth PlaceSpouses
1+

Eva Claire 

19 OCT 192611 DEC 1963  CA, Los Angeles Co, Los Angeles George Charles Sholin 
2+

James Herbert 

13 OCT 193029 JUL 2014  CA, Los Angeles Co Julia Lois "Lois" Miller 
3

Living

     
4+

Edward Eugene "Ed" 

13 JAN 193521 MAR 2012  CA, Ventura Co, Camarillo Helen Zagozan-Teddy 
5

Living

     
Asso-
ciates
NameYearsRelation
General Evangeline Cory Booth1925Comissioner (ordainer)
  1. Book:Commissioning of Cadets: Western Territorial Training College, The Salvation Army; Commissioning (ordination) at San Francisco;

Organizations, Memberships, & Religion (10)

NameYearsRelation
General Evangeline Cory Booth1925Commissioner (ordainer)
  1. Book:Commissioning of Cadets: Western Territorial Training College, The Salvation Army; Commissioning (ordination) at San Francisco;

Organizations, Memberships, & Religion (4)

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Tags
Sources
  1. Findagrave
  2. Billion Graves James H World, Billion Graves
  3. FamilySearch California Death Index, 1940-1997
  4. FamilySearch James World, Social Security Death Index
  5. FamilySearch United States Census, 1920
  6. FamilySearch United States Census, 1930
  7. FamilySearch United States Census, 1940
  8. Census: CA, Sacramento Co, Sutter Township. 1910 Census for Sutter Township, Sacramento, CA;
  9. Other: U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989; Ancestry;
  10. Other: California, Voter Registrations, 1900-1968;
  11. Other: Diaary of C. Vivian Page; spans the years of 1922 - 1939;
  12. Marriage Sources:
    FamilySearch California, County Marriages, 1850-1952
  1. Findagrave Cora Violet "Vi" Page World
  2. Billion Graves C Violet World, Billion Graves
  3. FamilySearch United States Census, 1910
  4. FamilySearch United States Census, 1920
  5. FamilySearch United States Census, 1930
  6. FamilySearch United States Census, 1940
  7. FamilySearch United States Census, 1940
  8. Other: State of California Certification of Vital Record: death certificate #3 051997 150051, Cora Violet Page;
  9. Other: U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989; Ancestry;
  10. Other: California, Voter Registrations, 1900-1968;
  11. Other: Diaary of C. Vivian Page; spans the years of 1922 - 1939;
  12. Marriage Sources:
    FamilySearch California, County Marriages, 1850-1952
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Added
5-19-2011 05:31 PM
5-19-2011 05:33 PM
Updated
12-19-2018 07:34 PM
11-8-2018 12:39 PM
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