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Our Family Tree: Introduction

Welcome! Our Family Tree is a full-featured, free, and online genealogy collaboration website intended both for people browsing, and a tool for researchers to maintain their trees and collaborate on their research efforts.

When browsing different websites it is inefficient for many people to be researching some of the same ancestors, all stored in separate parallel systems, rather than everyone contributing directly to the same system. This website hopefully encourages people to collaborate and work together on common ancestors, and eliminate duplicates copies of each person. Down the line somewhere we're all in the same family, so why not work in the same tree?

As much as possible the website also seeks to integrate family with history, highlighting biographical details, more about the places they lived, where and with whom they worked, and how they contributed to all who followed them.

More Introduction •  Features •  Guidelines •  More Rationale •  FAQ •  What's New

Spotlight: Sulgrave House —

Sulgrave House
 
The Sulgrave Club has occupied this Beaux-Arts mansion since 1932. Herbert and Martha Wadsworth of western New York State built the house in 1902 as their Washington social season home. Architect George Cary's design included a two-story ballroom, a drive-through entrance for carriages and automobiles, and an internal garage with turntable. During World War I, the Wadsworths lent the house to the American Red Cross. After her husband's death in 1927, Mrs. Wadsworth sold the home to a group of socially prominent women led by Mabel Boardman, a neighbor and national secretary of the Red Cross. They founded the Sulgrave Club for literary, musical, artistic, philanthropic, and social purposes and named it for George Washington's ancestral home in England, commemorating the bicentennial of his 1732. birth.