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The world's history is a divine poem, of which the history of every nation is a canto, and every man a word.
 

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Our Family Tree: Introduction

Welcome! Our Family Tree is a full-featured, free, and online genealogy collaboration website intended both for people browsing, and a tool for researchers to maintain their trees and collaborate on their research efforts.

When browsing different websites it is inefficient for many people to be researching some of the same ancestors, all stored in separate parallel systems, rather than everyone contributing directly to the same system. This website hopefully encourages people to collaborate and work together on common ancestors, and eliminate duplicates copies of each person. Down the line somewhere we're all in the same family, so why not work in the same tree?

As much as possible the website also seeks to integrate family with history, highlighting biographical details, more about the places they lived, where and with whom they worked, and how they contributed to all who followed them.

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Spotlight: Pierre van Cortlandt Jr — Westchester Co, NY

Pierre van Cortlandt Jr
 
Pierre Van Cortlandt Jr. graduated from Queen's College (forerunner of Rutgers University) In 1783. studied law with Alexander Hamilton. the future first secretary of the U.S. Treasury. and became an attorney in New York City. He later gave up his law practice to Manage the family holdings in Westchester County. He served in the New York State Assembly in the 1790s and followed his brother Philip to Washington, serving a term In the House of Representatives. 1811-13. lie was a member of the Board of Visitors at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. In 1833 he founded the Westchester County Bank in Peekskill, serving as Its president until his death. In 1840 he was a presidential elector for the winning Whig ticket of William Henry Harrison and John Tyler.