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Our Family Tree: Introduction

Welcome! Our Family Tree is a full-featured, free, and online genealogy collaboration website intended both for people browsing, and a tool for researchers to maintain their trees and collaborate on their research efforts.

When browsing different websites it is inefficient for many people to be researching some of the same ancestors, all stored in separate parallel systems, rather than everyone contributing directly to the same system. This website hopefully encourages people to collaborate and work together on common ancestors, and eliminate duplicates copies of each person. Down the line somewhere we're all in the same family, so why not work in the same tree?

As much as possible the website also seeks to integrate family with history, highlighting biographical details, more about the places they lived, where and with whom they worked, and how they contributed to all who followed them.

More Introduction •  Features •  Guidelines •  More Rationale •  FAQ •  What's New

Spotlight: Balvenie Castle — Morayshire, Scotland

Balvenie Castle
 
Balvenie Castle was built in the 13th century as the mighty stronghold of one of Scotland's foremost barons, Alexander Black Comyn, earl of Buchan (1244-89). It remained a noble residence for over four hundred years.

During that time, the castle developed from the awesome place of strength of a feudal baron to that of a stately dwelling befitting a Renaissance nobleman. That change is most noticeable here at the east front where, about 1550, John Stewart, 4th earl of Atholl (1542-79), broke out of the old defensive shield and had a stately mansion built.

Mary Queen of Scots’ entourage arrive at the castle in September 1562; reconstruction by Dave Pollock.