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Grand Pr
William McBee + Susannah Vardry
William Echols + Sarah Turner
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Vardry McBee12/23/1734 -- 1805
Hannah Echols1741 -- 1823
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ChildrenFirst NameBirth DtDeath DtBirth PlaceSpouses
1

Vardry Alexander 

04/17/181802/17/1904  NC  
Docs
  • Other, : Vardry Echols McBee (1775-1864) son of Vardry McBee and Hannah Echols, was one of the founders of the Pleasant Retreat Academy in Lincolnton, North Carolina before moving to South Carolina where he became known as , was known as "The father of Greenville [South Carolina]." His gifts included lands for the first four churches and the first academies. A constructive thinker, he recognized the potential sources of wealth in the country's climate and water power, and erected on the Reedy River one of the earliest cotton mills. He was instrumental in removing Furman University from Edgefield to Greenville in 1851, and in securing for Greenville in 1853 its first railroad, the Columbia and Greenville, later serving as its president.
  • Other, : While the lower areas of South Carolina had been settled for many years, Greenville County remained part of the old Cherokee hunting grounds and white men were strictly forbidden to enter the area. The Cherokee ceeded these lands to South Carolina in 1777. The Indians remained in their mountain homeland for several years after signing their grant, however, and not many white people ventured into the beautiful Cherokee country before the Revolution.

    The first white settler in present Greenville County was Richard Pearis, an Irishman, who came from Virginia about 1765 as a trader. He married a Cherokee woman and became so highly thought of by the Cherokee tribe that tradition records their repeated gifts to him of land that finally covered a tract 10 miles square. On part of this estate now stands the city of Greenville and Paris Mountain, it's name a corruption of Pearis. The enterprising settler called his acres "Great Plains.' He built a home, a mill, storehouses, and a trading post, and lived the life of a prince. He served with the British forces in the French and Indian War and had the distinction of being the first Britisher to enter Fort Dusquesne. When the Revolution began, Pearis's allegiance was sought by both sides. It is said that he had promised his help to the Americans, but, disappointed at the military rank offered him, turned to the King's party. He was probably more disappointed in how the Cherokee Indians were being treated. Held prisoner in Charles Town nine months, he became on his release a captain of the loyalist militia and attained the rank of colonel after performing several daring exploits. While he was in prison (1776) his plantation was captured and destroyed by Colonel John Thomas's Spartan regiment, on the grounds that it was a Cherokee and Tory stronghold. Ironically enough, after the fall of Charles Town, May 1780, Colonel Pearis received the 'submissions' or surrenders of General Andrew Pickens and, possibly, of Colonel Thomas. After the Revolution, Pearis settled in the Bahama Islands on a grant from the British Government.

    Greenville County was established in 1784. From this time thousands of settlers migrated to the area. It's name is variously said to honor General Nathanael Greene of Revolutionary fame or to recall Isaac Green, an early settler. Most evidence points to the last inference.

    Lemuel J. Alston, a brother of Governor Joseph Alston, the husband of the beautiful and ill-fated Theodosia Burr, came to the county in 1788. He bought 400 acres, 'a portion of the former plantation of Richard Pearis, and including his mill seat,' and there in 1797 laid out a village called Pleasantburg. Alston built a stately mansion in his little town, sure that settlers would soon be attracted, not only because of the proximity to the mountains, but because of the dawning possibilities for planting cotton and building mills.Edward Hooker, who visited Pleasantburg in 1806, gives this picture: "We. . . arrived at Col. Alston's home, which is the most beautiful I have seen in South Carolina. The mansion is on a commanding eminence which he calls Prospect Hill. From the village six hundred yards distant, there is a spacious avenue formed by two handsome rows of sycamore trees."

    In 1816 Alston sold his holdings to Vardry McBee. Born in Spartanburg County in 1775, McBee was called 'The Father of Greenville.' He leased the Alston house to Edmund Waddell for a hotel and summer resort until 1835, when he made it his own home, famous for hospitality until his death in 1864 at the age of 89. McBee's gifts included lands for the first four churches and the first academies. A constructive thinker, he recognized the potential sources of wealth in the country's climate and water power, and erected on the Reedy River one of the earliest cotton mills. He was instrumental in removing Furman University from Edgefield to Greenville in 1851, and in securing for Greenville in 1853 its first railroad, the Columbia and Greenville, later serving as its president. Pleasantburg flourished as a resort, connected even in its early days by what were then considered good roads leading toward western North Carolina and Tennessee, and toward Charleston and Augusta. The falls of the Reedy River were soon utilized to furnish power for iron works, corn, and cotton mills. Robert Mills commended the community in 1825 for its beautiful site, its two well-kept taverns, and its new courthouse. 'So much wealth, intelligence and leisure are collected annually at the village,' said Mills, that he could not but 'anticipate a favorable result to the interior of South Carolina.' Pleasantburg then had 500 inhabitants.In 1831 a progressive fever seized the town and its placid existence as a summer resort was disrupted by restless activity; stores, mills, and foundries sprang up. Citizens now wished their courthouse town to bear the county name. Accordingly, in 1831, little Pleasantburg vanished in the incorporation of Greenville and future industrialism was foreshadowed in the stir that replaced quietude. A busy factory, the predecessor of modern Camperdown Mills, usurped the young people's favorite swimming hole, opposite the site of Pearis's old mill.

    With the arrival of the railroad in 1853, Greenville's growth was assured. In the years preceding the War between the States, the community was a hot-bed of Union sentiment with Benjamin F. Perry, respected throughout the State, as the leading spirit. When war broke out, no battles were fought in the vicinity and the city did not lie in Sherman's path. Wayside hospitals were established and women labored to comfort and supply the needs of war-weary Confederate soldiers. The mountainous area surrounding Greenville was overrun by deserters. In organized bands they preyed so persistently on the property of citizens that Major A. D. Ashmore requested a cannon to destroy one of their blockhouses in the 'Dark Corner'. In June 1865, President Andrew Johnson appointed Perry provisional governor of South Carolina. James L. Orr of Anderson County succeeded him the following November.

    see also http://members.aol.com/mcbeenews/
    Information below from website of Danny A. McBee
    Vardry Echols McBee (Vardry3, William2, Matthew1) was born June 19, 1775 in Spartanburg District, South Carolina, and died January 23, 1864 in Greenville, South Carolina. He married Jane Alexander August 16, 1804 in her father's home Green River Plantation, daughter of Elias Alexander and Ann McCall.

    Notes for Vardry Echols McBee:
    Vardry McBee is shown in the 1820 Lincoln County, North Carolina Census as having three male children 10 years old and under, one male child 10 to 16 years of age, three male children 16 to 26 years of age, himself at 45 years of age, one female at 10 years old and under, one female at 10 to 16 years of age, and wife, Jane Alexander, 26 to 45 years of age. They are listed
    ashaving 12 slaves. Microfilm page number 382.

    The following article was in the Guest Column of the Gaston Observor, Wednesday, August 12, 1992, page 3. I have not copied the article in its entirety. The article was written by John R. Friday, North Carolina Superior Court emergency judge, who lives in Lincoln County. Vardry McBee was born June 19, 1775, to Scottish Quaker parents in the Spartanburg district of South Carolina. His father, also named Vardry, served with the Patriot army during the Revolutionary War, even though he was
    a Quaker. At age 12, the younger McBee was taken from school and worked for six years in an South Carolina limestone mine. At age 19, in 1794, he journeyed to Lincolnton, where he learned the saddle trade from his brother- in-law, Joseph Morris. About 1800 he traveled to Charleston, then with his parents to Kentucky, and later to Tennessee where he ran a saddler's shop. He soon returned to Lincolnton, where he established a saddlery in partnership with James Campbell. In 1804, young Vardry married Jane Alexander of Rutherford County. Within two years he sold his interest in the shop and bought a house and lot in Lincolnton (where First Methodist Church stands today) as well as a nearby farm. He proved highly successful as a farmer. In 1812, McBee became clerk of court in Lincoln County, a position he held until 1833. He also operated a saddlery and farmed during this time. He prospered with the combination of enterprises, and was counted as one of the
    leading citizens of Lincolnton. Perhaps the most significant event in his life was in 1815, when he bought several thousand acres from Col. Lemuel J. Allston in and around the area that is now Greenville, South Carolina. McBee first constructed a flour mill on the Reedy River below Greenville in 1817. This enterprise prospered so that in 1829 he built a second mill. Then, along
    with men he recruited from Lincoln County, he built a third flour mill below Greenville, a paper mill, a cotton mill and a woolen mill. Thus McBee, while living in Lincolnton, was heavily engaged in "the manufacture of flour, news- print, wrapping paper, cotton and woolen yarn and cloth" at his South Carolina plants. He also farmed. In 1833, McBee was a delegate to the Internal
    Improvement Convention at Raleigh. During 1836, the 61 year old McBee moved from Lincolnton to Greenville in order to supervise his business interest more closely. He was soon elected president of the Agriculture Society and won awards for his well-managed farms. McBee also became heavily involved with the railroad business, not surprising since his manufactured products had to be delivered. He became president of the Louisville and Cincinnati Railroad, and his generosity in purchasing stock saved the failing Greenville and Columbia railway. He also owned stock in the Seaboard and Roanoke railroads.
    His prosperous enterprises made him a man of wealth and influence. At 77, McBee was in good health and capable of riding almost 50 miles daily. Lincoln County historian William Sherrill reports that "he adhered to a high standard of morality and was always strictly temperate. McBee and his wife were the parents of nine children. Vardry McBee died at age 89 on January 23,
    1864. He and his wife are buried at Christ Episcopal Church in Greenville. He combined a pleasing personality and high moral standards with a shrewd business sense to amass fortunes, of which he gave generous portions to religious and educational organizations in North and South Carolina. He needs to be remembered as a benefactor of the people as well as one of the
    founders of Greenville, South Carolina.

    Q-417: 29 May 1830, Vardry McBee to Perry E. Duncan, $150, both Greenville District, South Carolina, lot near village of Greenville Court House near the Buncomb Road on the avenue leading to the female academy, la 25 poles; witness, Samuel Thompson, William T. Rawland; reg. 15 Dec 1830, Jane McBee relinquished dower, C. White. Y-157: 1847, Vardry McBee to Robert B. Duncan, 24 acres between Augusta and Anderson Roads.
    Vardry Echols McBee was barely 16 years old when he entered the service of the Confederacy and served during the last year of the war.
    The following is the obituary of Vardry McBee in The Edgefield Advertiser on February 3, 1864:
    Death of Vardry McBee, Esquire. This well-known citizen of Greenville and the oldest inhabitant of the place, expired on
    Saturday morning past at his residence in this town. By a life of temperance and carefullness, he had prolonged his years until he had attained his 89th year.
    By habits of industry and economy, he had amassed a large property which he used much to the advantage of the community by which he was surrounded. He was a leberal man - not by indifferently scattering his charities on any cause that appealed to his benevolence, but by a prudent and just discrimination contributing liberally of his means to those public objects he deemed
    important and beneficial to the country and giving to private purposes in those cases only where he had reason for believing his charities would not be squandered. Being the possessor, through his own energy and business acumen, of a large landed estate, he was thus enabled to make valuable donations of sites to various public purposes; and they now stand as monuments to
    the memory of a public-spirited citizen. Yesterday morning his remains were interred in the Episcopal Church yard. They were followed to the grave by a respectable concourse of citizens, thus united in paying their last sad tribute of respect to his memory. (I, Danny A. McBee, copied this obituary in its entirety from the book, McBee Genealogy, by Roy McBee Smith).

    Vardry McBee is called the "Father of Greenville" by many books, articles, and celebrations. In the year 1815, one of the most
    important deeds in Greenville history was made, the conveyance by Lemuel J. Alston to Vardry McBee of Lincolnton, North Carolina, conveying to him 11,028 acres. Thus the predominant ownership of the Greenville area passed into the hands of
    a man who for more than half a century was to play a leading and generous role in developing Greenville industrially, commercially and importantly encouraging its schools and churches. By 1824, much progress had been made in the
    County and in the village. The new academies had been built just north of the village on land donated by McBee and these first schools of Greenville were built by public subscription. Greenville Male and Female Academies - Greenville - 1821 - Built on land donated by Vardry McBee and by public subscription of citizens. Two brick buildings cost about $5,000.00. Among
    the instructors were: Dr. W. B. Johnson, Robert McKay, Rev. Hodges, Mr. Leary, Mr. Hallenquist, and Miss Charlotte Paine. Graduates of these schools included: Ben F. Perry, later Governor of the state; George Townes and the Croft brothers, who were to become famous citizens of nineteenth-century South Carolina. The Male Academy ceased operation about 1852 after Furman University was established with its preparatory department. The Female Academy continued until 1854, at which time the trustees deeded the land to the South Carolina Baptists to establish a Female College on the site which became Greenville Female College, now merged with Furman University. (The above last paragraph came from the book entitled Names in South
    Carolina, edited by Claude Henry Neuffer, Volume XVII: 42.

    Vardry McBee resigned the Presidency of the Louisville, Cincinatti and Charlotte Railroad March 26, 1840. (Taken from the Annals of Lincoln County by Sherrill).

    The children of Vardry McBee are well known and Thomas B. McBee is not listed among them. This rules out any possibility that Thomas B. McBee could be the son of Vardry McBee. (Danny A. McBee).

    Notes for Jane Alexander: Jane Alexander McBee died 49 days after her husband Vardry Echols McBee did. They were buried side by side, near their sons Luther Martin McBee and William Pinkney McBee.

    Children of Vardry McBee and Jane Alexander are:

    83 i. Joseph Gallishaw5 McBee, born August 20, 1805 in Lincolnton, North Carolina; died October 15, 1806 in Lincolnton, North Carolina.
    84 ii. Malinda Penelope McBee, born October 15, 1807 in Lincolnton, North Carolina; died January 02, 1891 in Greenville, South Carolina.


    Notes for Malinda Penelope McBee:
    Malinda (Melinda) was mentioned in the will of her grandfather, Elias
    Alexander. She was willed an unborn negro slave. Malinda fell in
    love with
    Turner Bynum, a handsome young man from Columbia who often visited in
    Pendleton and Greenville. Bynum was a student at South Carolina
    College.
    Bynum was killed in a duel with a rival newspaperman, Ben Perry,
    August 16,
    1832. Malinda's sorrow lasted a lifetime. She died unmarried at age
    84.
    Malinda Penelope McBee was the second child of Vardry and Jane
    Alexander
    McBee. She graduated from the Lincolnton Female Academy. She never
    married
    due to the fact that the love of her life was killed in a duel. She
    devoted
    her love to her nephews and nieces during her lifetime. Malinda
    inherited
    some of her father's business prudence. In his Will, he stated that
    she had
    no need of any bequest from him. He wrote: "She has quite a
    compatency of
    her own estate for decent maintenance during her life . . . Vardry
    did leave
    her $500.00, the equivalent of perhaps $10,000.00 at present. (Danny
    A.
    McBee).

    85 iii. Silas Le Roy McBee, born September 27, 1809 in Lincolnton, North Carolina; died September 14, 1827 in Lincolnton, North Carolina.
    86 iv. Luther Martin McBee, born January 13, 1812 in Lincolnton, North Carolina; died November 29, 1854 in Greenville, South Carolina. He married Susan Branford McCall December 05, 1845 in Greenville, South Carolina.

    Notes for Luther Martin McBee:
    Luther McBee practiced law with Benjamin (Ben) Franklin Perry in
    Greenville,
    North Carolina. Luther handled real estate and business matters for
    his
    father. Ben Perry handled Vardry McBee's litigation and was often his
    spokesperson. Luther died at the early age of 42 with a respiratory
    condition. Luther died without a Will. Luther had owned 30 acres in
    the
    village of Greenville and 7 slaves.
    There is a discrepancy in the birth date of Luther Martin McBee. Roy
    McBee
    Smith in his book entitled "McBee Genealogy" lists Luther Martin
    McBee's
    birth date as January 19, 1809, Lincolnton, North Carolina.

    Notes for Susan Branford McCall:
    Susan B. McBee shows up in the 1860 Greenville County, N. C., age 46,
    with
    children Vardry, 16, Anna, 12, Alexander, 11, Luther, age 6. Her
    daughter
    Susan Hayne McBee died in her seventh year.

    87 v. Hannah Echols McBee, born October 13, 1813 in Licolnton, North Carolina; died September 16, 1814 in Lincolnton, North Carolina.
    88 vi. Martha (Patsy) Adeline McBee, born May 01, 1816 in Lincolnton, North Carolina; died September 26, 1870 in Greenville, Caesar's Head, South Car.. She married Tench Coxe Carson October 06, 1835 in North Carolina.

    Notes for Tench Coxe Carson:
    According to Vardry McBee's will, he had "made large advances to Tench
    Carson
    and have notes and charges to a large amount which I hereby
    relinguish."

    89 vii. Vardry Alexander McBee, born April 17, 1818 in Lincolnton, North Carolina; died February 17, 1904 in Lincolnton, North Carolina. He married Mary Elizabeth Sumner December 16, 1847 in Lincolnton, North Carolina.

    Notes for Vardry Alexander McBee:
    Vardry Alexander McBee died February 17, 1904, in the same house in
    which he had lived all his days - the original McBee homestead in Lincolnton.
    According to Sherill, in the Lincoln County Annals: Vardry Alexander
    McBee had a bright mind, was a good student, had the best school advantages, was educated at Pleasant Retreat Academy in Lincolnton, of which his father was one of the founders, and at the University of North Carolina, from which he graduated in 1841 . . . although licensed as a lawyer, Mr. McBee was never active in the practice; he was three times Clerk of the Superior Court, covering in all a period of fourteen years; and represented the County in the Legislature in 1861. He was a public spirited and progressive citizen. He subscribed liberally to all movements for the public welfare; he was active inthe construction of the old plank road from Charlotte to Lincolnton, and in the building of the old Wilmington, Charlotte and Rutherford Railroad, of which he was treasurer and master of transportation, and he later took
    a
    prominent part in organizing the Chester and Lenoir Railroad, of which
    he was
    a director for many years. He owned a large plantation several miles
    from
    Lincolnton and prided himself in raising blooded stock, fine horses,
    cattle,
    hogs and even dogs, and encouraged the people of his native town to do
    likewise. He kept a good saddle horse and was a good rider and
    delighted in
    this exercise until far advanced in years. He wore a bear, spotlessly
    white,
    and never had a razor on his face. He lived a leisurely life, was a
    student
    all his days, never forgot the classics of his youth, and would read
    Latin in
    his old age as fluently as English, and always kept abreast of the
    times."
    Vardry Alexander McBee will was written, May 31, 1888, probated
    February 22,
    1904, wife Mary Elizabeth. Exec. none. Witnesses: none, book 5,
    page 270.

    Vardry Alexander McBee and Mary Elizabeth Sumner were married in
    Lincoln Co., North Carolina.

    Notes for Mary Elizabeth Sumner:
    Roy McBee Smith wrote in his book McBee Genealogy that Mary Elizabeth Sumner was born in Granville County, North Carolina. She moved to Lincolnton about 1845 when her father became the principal of the two Lincolnton academies.

    90 viii. William Pinkney McBee, born August 07, 1820 in Lincolnton, North Carolina; died October 06, 1860 in Greenville, South Carolina. He married Harriet Ford Butler June 16, 1846 in Greenville, South Carolina.

    Notes for William Pinkney McBee:
    William Pinkney McBee graduated from the University of North Carolina
    in 1842
    with a degree in Civil Engineering. He later studied law in
    Greenville,
    South Carolina. He was a member of the S. C. House of Representatives
    for the
    40th and 41st Sessions of the General Assembly, serving from November
    1852,
    through December 1855. Many of William Pinkney McBee's children
    received
    personal articles, furniture, documents, and correspondence of V. E.
    McBee.
    William was named for the prominent Maryland statesman, William
    Pinkney.

    Notes for Harriet Ford Butler:
    Harriet Ford Butler was a niece to the wife of Chancellor (Waddy)
    Thompson,
    Jr., Emmala Butler Thompson. Emmala's brothers were Andrew Pickens
    Butler,
    and Pierce M. Butler, and William Butler. There was a Lue Samuels,
    age 26,
    living in the home of William P. McBee and Harriet Butler McBee during
    the
    taking of the 1860 Greenville County, N. C. Census. (I, Danny A.
    McBee, have
    no idea who Lue Samuels was.

    91 ix. Stephen Alexander McBee, born May 22, 1822 in Lincolnton, North Carolina; died August 14, 1897 in Greenville, South Carolina. He married Henrietta R. D'Oyley Thurston January 1857.

    Notes for Stephen Alexander McBee:
    Stephen Alexander shows up in the 1850 Greenville, South Carolina
    Census in
    the house of Vardry and Jane McBee. Alexander was listed as 29 years
    old.
    His sister Malinda, age 43, also listed. Alexander shows up in the
    1860
    Greenville County, N. C. Census, age 39, with wife Henrietta R., 27,
    children
    Richard, 9, Elias 3, and Pinckney, age 3. I never knew that Elias and
    Pinckney were twins. I am not sure whether Richard was Luther or
    whether
    Richard died at a very young age. (Danny A. McBee).

    Notes for Henrietta R. D'Oyley Thurston:
    Charles W. D'Oyley and William DeBohun D'Oyley were brothers to
    Henrietta R.
    D'Oyley Thurston.

    Manuscripts Department
    Library of the University of North Carolina
    at Chapel Hill
    SOUTHERN HISTORICAL COLLECTION


    #2263
    MCBEE FAMILY PAPERS
    Summary

    NOTE: A more complete finding aid for this collection is available at the Southern Historical Collection.
    Contact staff at: (919)962-1345 (telephone); (919)962-4452 (FAX); mss@email.unc.edu.


    McBee family.
    Papers, 1754-1935.
    1,950 items (3.0 linear feet).

    Persons represented include Vardry McBee (1775-1864), planter, railroad
    official and promoter, and mill owner of Lincolnton, N.C., and Greenville,
    S.C.; his son, Vardry Alexander McBee (1818-1904), lawyer, planter, and
    railroad official and promoter, of Lincolnton, N.C.; and his grandson,
    Vardry McBee (ca. 1860-1938), Episcopal clergyman and musician in Wilkes
    County, N.C.

    Family correspondence and business papers including Lincoln County, N.C.,
    deeds; contracts, bills, accounts, promissory notes, and receipts; estate
    settlements, trustee and guardianship papers; and records of two Lincoln
    County clerks of court. Family letters written at Greenville, S.C.,
    1849-1869, give information about the McBees' varied enterprises,
    construction, and property there, and activities of members of the family.
    Other correspondence refers to efforts, 1821-1824, to establish a college
    at Lincolnton; college students at the University of North Carolina at
    Chapel Hill and the University of Tennessee at Knoxville; and slaves. Also
    included are four account books, 1852-1872, and papers of the treasurer of
    the Wilmington, Charlotte, and Rutherford Railroad. Twentieth century
    correspondence, largely personal, includes letters from Silas McBee
    (1853-1924).

    Purchases, 1940 and 1964.

    SEE ALSO: Silas McBee Papers (#2455) in the Southern Historical
    Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

    SEE ALSO: Vardry Alexander McBee Papers; James Thomas Williams, Jr.,
    Papers, Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Special Collections Library, Duke
    University.

    ONLINE CATALOG TERMS:
    Clerks of court--North Carolina--Lincoln County--History.
    College students--Southern States--Social life and customs--19th
    century.
    Estates (Law)--North Carolina.
    Estates (Law)--South Carolina.
    Family--South Carolina--Social life and customs--19th century.
    Greenville (S.C.)--History.
    Greenville (S.C.)--Industries--History--19th century.
    Lincolnton (N.C.)--History.
    McBee family.
    McBee, Silas, 1853-1924.
    McBee, Vardry, 1775-1864.
    McBee, Vardry, 1860?-1938.
    McBee, Vardry Alexander, 1818-1904.
    Plantation life--South Carolina.
    Plantation owners--North Carolina.
    Plantation owners--South Carolina.
    Railroads--Southern States--History--19th century.
    Slavery--South Carolina.
    Universities and colleges--North Carolina--History--19th century.
    University of North Carolina (1793-1962)--Students--History--19th
    century.
    University of Tennessee--Students--History--19th century.
    Wilmington, Charlotte, and Rutherford Railroad.

    COPYRIGHT: Retained by the authors of items in these papers, or
    their descendants, as stipulated by United States
    copyright law.
  • Other, : Vardy is often seen as Vardry "Echols" McBee. I think he did not have a middle name - it is not given in any historical accounts, only in various databases online. Probably picked up from his mother's maiden name as identification and mistaken for a given name.

    It seems doubtful that Vardy, the son, would have been counted in a census in 1790 as head of household since he would have been only 15 years old. No other Vardry McBees have surfaced, but certainly two of them were counted in 1790:
    1790 Census. North Carolina, Fayette Co.
    Vardray Magby 1 - 4 - 2
    South Carolina, Spartanburg
    Vardy Magbay: 1 - 3 - ?5 [number off the page]

    1800 Census, NC, Rutherford Co.
    Vardry McBee: 1m -10, 1m 10-16, 1m 16-26, 1m 26-45. 2f -10, 1f 26-45

    1810 Census, NC, Lincoln Co
    Vardry McBee: 3m 16-26, 1m 26-45. 2f -10, 1f 16-26

    1820 Census, NC, Lincoln Co, East of the South Fork of the Catawba River
    Vardry McBee: 3m -10, 1m 10-16, 3m 16-26, 1m 26-45
    1f -10, 1f 10-16, 1f 26-45

    1830 Census, NC, Lincoln Co
    [Capt.] Vardry McBee: 2m 5-10, 1m 10-15, 2m 15-20, 2m 20-30, 1m 50-60
    1f 5-10, 1f 10-15, 1f 20-30, 1f 40-50 18 slaves

    That a Vardry McBee was Clerk of the Lincoln County Court is proved by his certification and signature on several Revolutionary pension applications filed in Lincoln County in 1832 and 1833.

    1840 Census, Greenville Co, SC
    Vardery McBee: 1m 15-20, 3m 20-30, 1m 60-70 1f 30-40, 1f 50-60. 24 slaves

    1850 Census, Town of Greenville, Greenville Co, SC, Hh 2347
    Vardery McBee, age 74, farmer, value of property $60,000, b. SC
    Jane, 67, b. NC.
    Malinda, age 43, b. NC. Stephen Alexander, age 29, Millwright, b. NC
    T. C. Carson, age 40, farmer, b. NC. Martha, age 34, b. NC
    their children born in SC: Joseph 13, Vardry 11, Jane 8, Charles 5

    Hh 1335
    L. M. McBee, age 38, lawyer, [family all marked as born in SC]
    Susan, age 34. Vardry 4, Annie, 2, Alexander, 1.
    Hh 2285
    W. P. McBee, age 30, merchant, b. NC. Harriet, age 27. Frank 4, Vardry 1.

    1860 Census, Town of Greenville, Greenville Co, SC Hh 2090
    Vardry McBee, age 85, Farmer, Value of Real Estate $185,000. Value of personal property [slaves] $182,350. born SC
    Jane, age 77, b. NC. Malinda P. age 50, b. NC.
    Elias Alexander, age 68, miller, b. NC [Jane's brother?]
    Gabriel Cothran, age 20, apprentice, b. SC
    Jacob Cagle, age 28, millwright, b. NC
    Jane Carson, age 17, b. SC
    Next household was that of son William P.McBee.
    Hh2091
    Wm P. McBee, age 40, farmer, b. NC. Harriet B. 37, b. SC
    Children all born in SC: Frank B. 13, Vardry 11, Malinda P. 6, Emily L. 4
    Sue Samuels, age 26, b. SC
    Hh 2264
    Alex McBee, age 39, manufacturer, b. NC. Henrietta R., age 27, b. SC
    Richard 9, Elias 3, and Pinkney 3. [apparently twins]
    Hh 2282
    Susan B. McBee, age 44, b. SC [Luther's widow]
    Vardry 14, Anna 12, Alexander 11, and Luther 6

    1860, Greenville Co, Oil Camp Hh 1379
    Tench Carson, age 50, farmer, b. NC. Martha A., age 45, b. NC
    Joseph 23, b. SC. Jane 17, b. SC [probably counted twice] Charles 15, b. SC

    From the online indexes of the South Carolina Archives:
    Series Number: S165015 Year: 1817
    Item: 00093 ignore: 00
    Date: 1817/11/28
    Description: MCBEE, VARDRY, PETITION ASKING FOR PERMISSION TO BRING NOT MORE THAN THIRTY SLAVES INTO THE STATE FROM NORTH CAROLINA. (2 PAGES)
    Names Indexed: MCBEE, VARDRY/ALSTON, LEMUEL J./EARLE, GEORGE W./
    Locations: LINCOLN COUNTY, N.C./NORTH CAROLINA/GREENVILLE DISTRICT

    Series Number: S213192 Volume: 0049
    Page: 00320 Item: 01
    Date: 1831/05/31
    Description: MCBEE, VARDRY, PLAT FOR 718 ACRES ON REEDY RIVER, GREENVILLE DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY JOHN WATSON, SHOWING LOTS OWNED BY JAMES GIRLEY AND OTHERS.
    Names Indexed: MCBEE, VARDRY/WATSON, JOHN/GIRLEY, JAMES/THOMPSON, WADDY/HARRISON, RICHARD/BALE, JOHN/EATESFIELD, DR./VICKERS, ALEXANDER/EARLE, R./WILLIAMS, THOMAS B./TOWNS, GEORGE F.
    Locations: GREENVILLE DISTRICT/REEDY RIVER/BRUSHY CREEK
    Series Number: S213192 Volume: 0049
    Page: 00335 Item: 10

    Date: 1831/07/01
    Description: MCBEE, VARDRY, PLAT FOR 2,048 ACRES ON FORK OF BRUSHY CREEK AND LONG BRANCH, GREENVILLE DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY JOHN WATSON, SHOWING PLAT FOR 102 ACRES OWNED BY W. T. ROWLAND.
    Names Indexed: MCBEE, VARDRY/WATSON, JOHN/WILLIAMS, THOMAS B./JENNINGS, F. E. E./JACOBS, WILLIAM/WALKER, G./CLEVELAND, JEREMIAH/ALSTON, JOSEPH/WADDELL, E./GORDON, JOHN/ROWLAND, W. T.
    Locations: GREENVILLE DISTRICT/BRUSHY CREEK/LONG BRANCH/REEDY RIVER
    Type: PLAT/
    Series Number: S213192 Volume: 0049
    Page: 00333 Item: 10

    Date: 1831/07/12
    Description: MCBEE, VARDRY, PLAT FOR 2,199 ACRES ON MOUNTAIN CREEK, GREENVILLE DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY JOHN WATSON.
    Names Indexed: MCBEE, VARDRY/WATSON, JOHN/EDWARDS, HIRAM/CROFT, EDWARD/GOODLETT, Z./THOMPSON, W./ROBERTS, JAMES/BROOKSHIRE, MANERING/HOOKER, JAMES/THOMPSON, SAMUEL/TAYLER, WILLIAM/OLIVER, JOHN
    Locations: GREENVILLE DISTRICT/MOUNTAIN CREEK/ENOREE RIVER/PINEY MOUNTAIN
    Type: PLAT/

    Series Number: S165015 Year: 1841
    Item: 00038 ignore: 00
    Date: 1841/11/18
    Description: INHABITANTS OF GREENVILLE, PETITION TO RENEW GREENVILLES CHARTER. (4 PAGES)
    Names Indexed: GOODLETT, W. M./COLE, H. W./MONTGOMERY, R. M./PERRY, B. F./DYER, G. B./GERARD, F. G./CHOICE, JEFFERSON/TOWNES, G. F./CRITTENDEN, JOHN/MCBEE, V./MCBEE, A./WALKER, TANDY/NICHOL, A./THURSTON, L. S./STOKES, C. R./CLEVELAND, JEREMIAH/DUNAHM, B./BLEAKLEY, A./DAVENPORT, WILLIAM/LONG, J. W.
    Locations: GREENVILLE/GREENVILLE DISTRICT
    Type: PETITION/
    Topics: CITY COUNCIL, GREENVILLE/

    Series Number: S165015 Year: ND00
    Item: 03168 ignore: 00
    Date: 1856 C.
    Description: CITIZENS OF GREENVILLE, PETITION TO ESTABLISH AND INCORPORATE A SUMMER MEDICAL SCHOOL IN GREENVILLE. (4 PAGES)
    Names Indexed: EDWARDS, P. C./CAMPBELL, W. H./THURSTON, A. LEE/FURMAN, JAMES C./GRADY, JOHN W./JONES, E. P./EASLEY, W. K./ELDRIDGE, JEREMIAH/JOYCE, A. J./MCDANIEL, W. A./GOODLETT, R. H./GOODLETT, S. D./MCBEE, VARDRY/MCBEE, ALEXANDER/DUNCAN, R. B./DUNCAN, P. E./BEATTIE, F. F./DOYLEY, C. W./ISAACS, A./HOOEY, W. H.
    Locations: GREENVILLE/
    Type: PETITION/
    Topics: COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES/MEDICINE, PRACTICE OF

    The best documentation I have found for Vardry McBee, son of Vardry & Hannah is online from the following:
    Manuscripts Department, University Library of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    http://www.lib.unc.edu/mss/inv/htm/02263.html
    Inventory of the McBee Family Papers, 1754-1937
    Collection Number 2263
    Biographical Note
    Vardry McBee (1775-1864) was the son of Captain McBee, a Virginian who settled in what is now upper South Carolina prior to 1770. Captain McBee was constable of Tryon County in 1770 and later fought on the Whig side in the Revolution. He owned valuable lands in the Spartanburg district, including Limestone Springs, but lost them shortly after the Revolution, apparently as the result of poor management.
    When his father lost the land, circa 1777, young Vardry McBee left school and went to work in the manufacture of lime. In 1793, he went to Lincolnton, N.C., apprenticed to his brother-in-law Joseph Morris, to learn the saddler's trade. In 1800, he moved to Charleston, S.C., only to return to Lincolnton, then relocate with his family to Kentucky a short time later. He opened a saddle shop in middle Tennessee in 1801, but the following year he returned to Lincolnton to open a store in partnership with John Campbell of Charleston, S.C. He sold his interests in this store in 1805.
    In 1812, McBee became clerk of court of Lincoln County, N.C., a post he held until 1833. In 1815, he bought several thousand acres of land in and around the town of Greenville, S.C. In 1817, he built a flour mill there, and, in 1829, he built a second mill. He later added a woolen mill, a cotton mill, and a paper factory. He was an important delegate to the 1833 North Carolina Convention on Internal Improvements. He moved from Lincolnton to Greenville in 1836 in order to be closer to his many business interests there.
    McBee became interested in railroads and served as president of the Louisville, Cincinnati, and Charleston project. He subscribed to $50,000 worth of stock of the Greenville and Columbia railroad, saving the company from extinction and becoming the largest individual subscriber of railroad stock in the United States up to that time. He was also interested in agricultural affairs and was active in the promotion of better agricultural practices. Until his death in 1864, he was a wealthy and influential man in upper South Carolina.
    Vardry McBee married Jane Alexander, daughter of Colonel Elias Alexander of Rutherford County, N.C., in 1805. The McBees had nine children: Joseph Gallishaw, Malinda Penelope, Silas L., Luther Martin, Hannah E., Martha ("Patsy") Adeline, Vardry Alexander, William Pinkney, and Alexander.
    Their son Vardry Alexander McBee (1818-1904) was educated at Pleasant Retreat Academy in Lincolnton and graduated from the University of North Carolina in 1841. He studied law and passed the bar examination, but was never active in the practice of law. He thrice served as clerk of court of Lincoln County and represented the county in the General Assembly in 1861 when he was elected without opposition to fill the unexpired term of his friend John F. Hoke, who had resigned to enter the Confederate Army.
    Vardry Alexander McBee was a successful planter. He owned a large plantation several miles from Lincolnton. In addition, he was active in the construction of plank roads and railroads. He was treasurer of the Wilmington, Charlotte, and Rutherford Railroad Company and had a prominent part in the organization of the Chester and Lenoir Railroad. McBee was active in business, civic, and church affairs of Lincolnton and western North Carolina until his death in 1904.
    Vardry Alexander McBee married Mary E. Sumner, whose father was then in charge of the male and female academies of Lincolnton. The McBees had nine children: Jane, Sarah, Mary ("Mamie"), Anne, Martha, Sumner, Silas, Vardry, and Thomas.
    Their son Vardry McBee (1860?-1938) was educated at the University of the South at Sewannee, Tenn., and attended a theological seminary in New York. He became an Episcopal priest, but apparently retired from the ministry around 1896, possibly because of ill health. McBee was a gifted musician and was at one time the organist at Trinity Church in New York City. He married Anne Joyce Gwyn, the daughter of James and Mary Lenoir Gwyn of "Green Hill," Ronda, Wilkes County, N.C. Anne Gwyn was an artist and apparently made portraits and tapestries for various people around the state.
    Additional information about the McBee family and about some of the people whose letters are present in this collection may be found in William E. Sherrill's Annals of Lincoln County, North Carolina (1937) and in Thomas F. Hickerson's Happy Valley (1940).

    Vardry MCBEE and Jane ALEXANDER were married on 16 August 1804 in North Carolina. Jane ALEXANDER was born (date unknown).

    Jane was the daughter of Col. Elias Alexander of Rutherford Co NC. Her mother said to be Ann McCall.

    Date: Wed, 17 May 2000 20:13:25 -0700
    From: Olive Ruth Alexander .
    Source: ALEXANDER-L@rootsweb.com
    Subject: Re: [ALEXANDER-L]
    Alexander Genealogy . HISTORY OFF OLD TRYON AND RUTHERFORD COUNTIES, NORTH CAROLINA 1730-1936 By Clarence W. Griffin, Asheville, NC: The Miller Printing Company, 1937 Page 170:
    Senator Elias Alexander, III, was a son of Elias Alexander, II, who was born in Maryland in 1746.
    Elias Alexander, I, lived in Maryland and died there in 1747. His wife was Ann Taylor, who died in Mecklenburg Co., NC, in 1800. Elias Alexander, II, was a son of this couple. He migrated to Mecklenburg Co. with other Alexanders, and settled in the Sugaw Creek settlement, a few miles north of Charlotte.
    Elias, II, later removed to Rutherford Co., and was a valiant soldier in the Revolution, participating in the battles at Kings Mountain and Guilford Court House. His wife, Agnes (McCall) Alexander, died in Rutherford Co. in 1826 and Col. Elias Alexander died May 13, 1818. They had eleven children:
    (1) Francis Alexander (1778-1852), many years county surveyor of Rutherford Co. His daughter, Jane McBee, married Francis S. Coxe of Philadelphia, April 24, 1823. They were the parents of the late Frank Coxe of Asheville. Margaret Rebecca, another daughter of Francis Alexander, married Rev. Campbell Smith of the South Carolina Methodist Conference. A son, Ross Alexander, Jr., married Charlotte Hill and they were parents of the late J. F. Alexander, Forest City lumberman, businessman, textile manufaccturer and Assemblyman, and Hon. A. C. Alexander, of Georgia.
    (2) Major Ross Alexander, Sr., son of Elias, II, was thrown from a mule and killed July 6, 1849, near Hazelhurst Farm, three miles south of Forest City.
    (3) Anna married Stephen Camp.
    (4) Jane married Verdry McBee, of Lincolnton.
    (5) Margaret married Col. David Reinhardt.
    (6) Patsy Blanton married Jacob Fisher.
    (7) William Alexander died 1821.
    (8) Elias Alexander, III, son of Elias, II, was State Sentor in 1832. He was living in Greenville, SC, in 1875.
    (9) James Taylor Alexander.
    (10 and 11) Thomas and Alston Alexander both died young.

    Vardry MCBEE and Jane ALEXANDER had the following children:

    128

    i.

    Joseph Gallishaw MCBEE was born on 20 August 1805 in Lincolnton, Lincoln County, North Carolina. He died on 15 October 1806 at the age of 1 in Lincolnton, Lincoln County, North Carolina.
    129

    ii.

    Malinda Penelope MCBEE was born on 15 October 1807 in Lincolnton, Lincoln County, North Carolina. She died on 2 January 1891 at the age of 83 in Greenville, Greenville County, South Carolina.
    1860 Census, Town of Greenville, Greenville Co, SC Hh 2090
    Vardry McBee, age 85, Farmer, Value of Real Estate $185,000. Value of personal property [slaves] $182,350. born SC
    Jane, age 77, b. NC. Malinda P. age 50, b. NC.

    Malinda never married. She is said to have mentioned in the will of her grandfather, Elias Alexander. She was in love with Turner Bynum, who was killed in a duel in 1832.

    In the 1880 census she was living with her youngest brother and his family.

    130

    iii.

    Silas Leroy MCBEE was born on 27 September 1809 in Lincolnton, Lincoln County, North Carolina. He died on 14 September 1827 at the age of 17 in Lincolnton, Lincoln County, North Carolina.
    131

    iv.

    Luther Martin MCBEE was born on 13 January 1812 in Lincolnton, Lincoln County, North Carolina. He died on 29 November 1854 at the age of 42 in Greenville, Greenville County, South Carolina.
    Luther married Susan Branford McCall on 5 Dec 1845, Greenville SC.

    1850, Greenville, SC
    Hh 1335
    L. M. McBee, age 38, lawyer, [family all marked as born in SC]
    Susan, age 34. Vardry 4, Annie, 2, Alexander, 1.

    1860, Greenville, SC
    Hh 2282
    Susan B. McBee, age 44, b. SC [Luther's widow]
    Vardry 14, Anna 12, Alexander 11, and Luther 6

    1870, Greenville, SC Hh 22
    Susan B. McBee, age 54. Vardry, age 23. Alexander, age 21. Luther age 16.
    Susan B. McCall, age 80, b. SC. Ann McCall, age 52, b. SC.

    132

    v.

    Hannah Echols MCBEE was born on 13 October 1813 in Lincolnton, Lincoln County, North Carolina. She died on 16 September 1814 at the age of 0 in Lincolnton, Lincoln County, North Carolina.
    133

    vi.

    Martha Adeline MCBEE was born on 1 May 1816 in Lincolnton, Lincoln County, North Carolina.
    Martha married Tench Coxe Carson on 6 Oct 1835. They were living with her father in 1850.

    1850 Census, Town of Greenville, Greenville Co, SC, Hh 2347
    Vardery McBee, age 74, farmer, value of property $60,000, b. SC
    Jane, 67, b. NC.
    Malinda, age 43, b. NC. Stephen Alexander, age 29, Millwright, b. NC
    T. C. Carson, age 40, farmer, b. NC. Martha, age 34, b. NC
    their children born in SC: Joseph 13, Vardry 11, Jane 8, Charles 5

    1860, Greenville Co, Oil Camp Hh 1379
    Tench Carson, age 50, farmer, b. NC. Martha A., age 45, b. NC
    Joseph 23, b. SC. Jane 17, b. SC [probably counted twice because she was also listed with her grandfather] Charles 15, b. SC

    134

    vii.

    Vardry Alexander MCBEE was born on 17 April 1818 in Lincolnton, Lincoln County, North Carolina. He died on 17 February 1904 at the age of 85 in Lincolnton, Lincoln County, North Carolina.
    Vardry married Mary Elizabeth Sumner, 16 Dec 1847, in North Carolina. He lived on the original McBee homestead in Lincolnton.

    1850, Lincoln Co NC,
    V. A. McBee, age 32, Lawyer, b. NC. Mary E., age 20, b. NC
    Jane age 4/12

    1860, Lincolnton, Lincoln Co, NC Hh 124
    V. A. McBee, age 42, Clerk, Superior Court, b. Lincolnton
    Mary, age 31, b. Gates Co
    Ann, age 10. Sumner, age 8. Silas, age 6. Sallie age 4. Vardry, 7/12.

    1870, Lincolnton, Lincoln Co, NC Hh 20
    Vardry A. McBee, age 52, Farmer. Mary E. age 41.
    Sumner 18, Silas 17, Sarah 14, Vardry 10, Mary 8, Annie 5, Thomas 3, Martha 8 months, born Sept 1869.

    1880, Lincolnton, Lincoln Co NC Hh 392
    Vardry McBee, age farmer, b. NC, father b. SC, mother b. NC
    Mary E. wife, age 51, b. NC, father b. NC, mother b. VA
    Sallie 24, Mary 18, Annie 16, Martha 10 - daughters

    1900, Lincolnton, LIncoln Co NC Hh 70
    Vardry A. McBee, age 82, b. April 1818, married for 52 years. Born SC, father b. SC, mother b. NC
    Mary E., wife, age 71, b. Jan 1829. She had 11 children, 7 are still living.

    135

    viii.

    William Pinkney MCBEE was born on 7 August 1820 in Lincolnton, Lincoln County, North Carolina. He died on 6 October 1860 at the age of 40 in Greenville, Greenville County, South Carolina.
    William married Harriet Ford Butler on 16 Jun 1846 in Greenville SC.

    1850 Census, Greenville, Greenville Co SC
    Hh 2285
    W. P. McBee, age 30, merchant, b. NC. Harriet, age 27. Frank 4, Vardry 1.

    1860 Census, Greenville, next door to his father.
    Hh2091
    Wm P. McBee, age 40, farmer, b. NC. Harriet B. 37, b. SC
    Children all born in SC: Frank B. 13, Vardry 11, Malinda P. 6, Emily L. 4
    Sue Samuels, age 26, b. SC

    1870 Census, Greenville
    Hh 30
    H. B. McBee, female, age 47, keeping house
    Vardry E., age 21. Melinda P. age 16. Emily L., age 14.
    G. L. Butler, [male] age 53, gin maker. L. F. Bulter [female] age 18.
    Susan V. Samuel, age 36
    Martha Moore, age 25, Black, cook. Moore children: Sallie 10, Andrew 7, Simpson 5, James 2.
    William Wickliff, age 14, Black, works on farm.
    Robert Sloan, age 11, Mulatto, works on farm.
    Laura Sloan, age 15, Black, chambermaid
    Anna Sloan, age 1, Mulatto

    136

    ix.

    Stephen Alexander MCBEE was born on 22 May 1822 in Lincolnton, Lincoln County, North Carolina. He died on 14 August 1897 at the age of 75 in Greenville, Greenville County, South Carolina.
    Stephen married Henrietta R. D'Oyley in January of 1857.

    1860 Census. Greenville, Greenville Co, SC
    Hh 2264
    Alex McBee, age 39, manufacturer, b. NC. Henrietta R., age 27, b. SC
    Richard 9, Elias 3, and Pinkney 3. [apparently twins, or is Pinkney 3 months?]
    [Richard cannot be their child. See 1880 Census.]
    1870 Census. Greenville, SC
    Hh 44 Alex McBee, age 48, Miller. H. R. [female] age 37.
    E.A. 13, male. W. P. 10, male. W. D. 8, male. S. L. 6, male. L. M. 4, male,
    F. B. 1, male. and M. P. age 6, female.
    Elias Alexander, age 75, b. NC
    Rebecca Mills, age 18, mulatto, servant
    Dora Turner, age 14, Black, house servant
    Florinda Turner, age 22, Black, cook
    Caty Turner, age 75, Black
    Alice Jones, age 12, Black

    1880 Census. Greenville, SC Hh 327
    Alexander McBee, age 59. Henrietta, wife, age 48
    Elias, 23, son, lawyer. Pinkney, 20, clerk in Corner Store
    William 18, at school. Silas 16, at school. Luther, 14, at school. Frank, 10, at school. Joseph 8, at school. Teyton, 5. Sarah 3.
    Malinda, age 72, sister.
    Richard Thurston, age 28, stepson
    15 Black or mulatto persons are listed - servants and their families.
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